What should educators know about diversity in order to effectively educate all students, especially those from diverse backgrounds? The answers were rather straightforward. Educators should be cognizant of the various theories of diversity and understand the divergent views of why some students succeed in school while others have tenuous relationships with school systems sometimes for reasons that are not unrelated to their identities. They should understand the dialectical role of schools as simultaneously empowering and disempowering social institutions. They should also understand how the various elements of diversity intersect with teaching and learning. Most importantly, they should be able to challenge the status quo and empower all students through the contents they teach as well as through their pedagogical practices. 

Author Benedicta Egbo's main objective in this second edition of Teaching for Diversity in Canadian Schools remains that of providing a Canadian perspective on an issue that should be of significant interest to all educators and Canadians, especially given the sociopolitical vicissitudes of our contemporary world in which diversity is, ironically, one of the few stable phenomena. One fact is incontrovertible—these are unsettling times, and works such as this take on renewed urgency as we strive towards creating more just and inclusive societies and institutions nationally and, arguably, internationally.