Annick Science

 
 

Power Up! A Visual Exploration of Energy

Written by Shaker N. Paleja
Illustrated by Glenda Tse

It's impossible to imagine our lives without energy, but how often do we really think about where it comes from? With Power Up! discovering what you need to know about energy is easy and fun. Each bright, dynamic spread illustrates cool facts about energy use with colourful infographics, including charts, diagrams, and maps.

 

Bones Never Lie: How Forensics Helps Solve History’s Mysteries

Written by Elizabeth MacLeod

Seven intriguing stories about historical royal figures whose demise was suspicious, and hard scientific facts about crime-solving techniques make each event seem like an episode of CSI rather than a history lesson.

Kids will be fascinated to find out how scientists use autopsy results, DNA testing, bone fragments, and even insects to determine the cause of death.

At times a gripping whodunit, at others an exercise in deductive reasoning, this book will be hard to put down for any kids who love mysteries, murder, and suspense.

 

Before the World Was Ready: Stories of Daring Genius in Science

Written by Sa Boothroyd

In this thought-provoking book, you’ll find out what happened when people weren’t ready to listen to innovators who came up with revolutionary ideas. Discover how Alfred Wegener struggled to convince geologists that the ground beneath our feet is moving, why “mad scientist” Nikola Tesla’s futuristic ideas about electricity were dismissed, why Charles Darwin delayed publishing his controversial theory of evolution for decades, and how Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace nearly invented the first computer in the 1800s. You’ll also meet Copernicus, who proposed a sun-centered model of the universe; Ignaz Semmelweis, who tried in vain to persuade doctors to use disinfection methods; the aviation pioneer George Cayley, whose ideas were decades ahead of the technology that would make them work; and Rachel Carson, who sounded the first alarm about the effects of pesticides on wildlife. Nowadays, we think of these scientists as heroes, but they all endured great personal hardships for daring to think differently.

 

Potatoes on Rooftops: Farming in the City

Written by Hadley Dyer

From high school students to high-rise dwellers, people—including Michelle Obama—are discovering innovative ways to grow fresh, healthy, and delicious fruit and vegetables at home, in community gardens, and at school. This brisk, informative overview explains how farming in the city is not only fun, but also important for the planet.

There are many ways to farm in the city: a Detroit high school program teaches students to grow food and raise chickens; in Tokyo, a bank vault was converted into an underground greenhouse; in Nairobi, local youth transformed part of a slum into a garden that helps feed their families. Read about modern inventions such as futuristic pod greenhouses, food-producing wall panels, and industrial-sized composters.

Short, kid-friendly descriptions and vibrant photos and illustrations keep the pace moving and the tone light. 

 

Nibbling on Einstein’s Brain: The Good, the Bad, and the Bogus in Science

Written by Diane Swanson
Illustrated by Francis Blake

Science affects every part of our lives. It can determine the foods we eat, the clothes we wear, even the video games we play. But how do you tell the good science from the bad?

Bite into Nibbling on Einstein’s Brain and learn some winning strategies for sorting the good from the misleading in science.

Through playful scenarios and fascinating real-world examples, each chapter encourages critical thinking. You’ll find tips for spotting bad science, ideas for identifying reports that misrepresent facts, and ways to keep your own brain from muddling the science news you receive.

 

Kaboom! Explosions of All Kinds

Written by Gillian Richardson

Who knew that some insects can create explosions to get food? Or that fireworks were once used to fight wars?

Explosions are all around us, from the Big Bang that created the universe to the “pop” of a seedpod, from solar flares to the explosive gases lurking in a coal mine.

Full of fun facts, dramatic images and highlights of momentous blasts in history, Kaboom! examines an astonishing variety of explosions and the science behind them.

 

DNA Detective

Written by Tanya Lloyd Kyi
Illustrated by Lil Crump

In DNA Detective, Lloyd Kyi unravels the mystery of our genetic blueprint. She explains the basics of genetics in simple, clear language, and reveals the fascinating, and frequently entertaining stories of the researchers who discovered pieces of the DNA puzzle.

As they learn the science of genes, readers will apply what they learn at the end of each chapter in an engaging challenge: helping a young detective eliminate suspects to solve a major crime, based on a real-world case.

From genetically engineered pets to a dating app that helps Icelanders avoid marrying their cousins, the world of DNA will surprise and delight you.

 

Foodprints: The Story of What We Eat

Written by Paula Ayer

Today’s teens are more attuned to what they eat and where it comes from than any generation before them. But there’s still more to know. Foodprints enables readers to do more than sort through the numerous messages they hear and read about food—they also get the big picture about food production, marketing, and its role in society. Readers will discover:

  • How our food system evolved from hunter gatherers to on-line ordering
  • How mega farms and factories came to produce the bulk of our current food supply
  • How to work through confusing nutrition advice like good and bad carbs, as well as trendy superfoods such as kale, and fad diets
  • The role of science in the modern food system, from improving safety and convenience to GMOs and artificial flavors
  • Why food advertisers want teens’ attention and how they get it
  • Stories about youth who are working to shape the future of food in positive ways, such as guerilla gardening and media activism
 

The World in Your Lunch Box: The Wacky History and Weird Science of Everyday Foods

Written by Claire Eamer
Illustrated by Sa Boothroyd

A ham sandwich on white bread. Macaroni and cheese. Peanut-butter-and-banana roll-ups. They may sound like ordinary items, but they take us on an amazing journey through the rich history and astonishing science of food.

Explore a week of lunches—from apples to pizza—by taking a romp through thousands of years of extraordinary events. Some are amusing, like the accidental invention of potato chips. Others are tragic, such as the Spice Wars, which killed thousands of people.

With a vibrant design and quirky illustrations, The World in Your Lunch Box is like the perfect lunch: satisfying, well-balanced, and totally delicious.

 

Patient Zero: Solving the Mysteries of Deadly Epidemics

Written by Marilee Peters

Engrossing true stories of the pioneers of epidemiology who risked their lives to find the source of deadly diseases.

Throughout history, more people have died in disease epidemics than in wars or other disasters. The courageous, trail-blazing defenders against these diseases faced a terrifying personal gamble. Often they were ignored, laughed at, or even fired from their jobs. But they kept hunting for answers, putting the pieces of the epidemic puzzle together.

Patient Zero brilliantly brings to life the main characters and events to tell the gripping tale of how each of seven diseases spread.

 

The Adventures of Medical Man: Kids’ Illnesses and Injuries Explained

Written by Dr. Michael Evans and David Wichman
Illustrated by Gareth Williams

Enter Dr. Michael Evans, who will explain to young readers everything they need to know when an illness or injury occurs. Uniquely structured around five different movie genres and one comic book, each chapter features a common illness or injury with Dr. Mike in the starring role, explaining the causes, symptoms and cures.

Complete with diagrams, sidebars and a glossary—and dramatized by Gareth Williams’s stunning illustrations—this book will be a comfort to any child dealing with an injury or illness. 

 

All the Dirt A History on Getting Clean

Written by Katherine Ashenburg

Cleanliness is next to godliness. At least that was the point of view espoused by John Wesley in 18th century England. But accounts of people bathing go back to the Bronze Age in the Indus Valley.

All the Dirt on Getting Clean is a lively, informative exploration of the evolution of keeping clean. Starting with a number of myths about cleanliness, the author quickly establishes how our ideas have changed drastically over time, and how the definition of cleanliness in one part of the world may differ radically from another. There is just enough of a gross factor that the target audience of 9 to 12-year-olds will find the book as entertaining as it is enlightening.

Colorful spreads, lots of sidebars, humorous illustrations, and photos make it ideal for browsing as well as reading in depth.

 

To Burp or Not to Burp

Written by Dr. Dave Williams & Loredana Cunti

Of all the questions astronauts are asked by kids, the most frequent one is “How do you go to the toilet in space?” This book not only answers that question, but many others about the effect of zero gravity on the human body: How do you brush your hair in space? What happens when you sweat? What does food taste like? The best thing is that the answers are provided by Dr. Dave Williams, a NASA astronaut who speaks from first-hand experience.

Written for kids ages 7 to 10, this book uses age-appropriate language to explain the different phenomena that astronauts encounter during a mission. The bright, colorful pages, short blocks of text accompanied by photos and humorous illustrations make this a very attractive choice for young readers. The opening message from Dr. Dave empowers kids to follow his example by believing in themselves and following their dreams.

 

Water Wow!

Written by Antonia Banyard & Paula Ayer
Illustrated by Belle Wuthrich

A colourful infographic look at the many surprising and fascinating facts about water. Where did water come from before it got to Earth? Why is the water you drink the same stuff that was around when dinosaurs were alive? If water can’t be created or destroyed, how can we run out? Find out the answers to these and many more intriguing questions in this vibrant book, designed to appeal to visual learners.

Filled to the brim with colourful illustrations and diagrams, easy-to-understand infographics, and illuminating photos, Water Wow! is a dazzling and fun introduction to the importance of water in our lives.